Archive for April, 2011

Richard Florida
by Richard Florida
Fri Apr 29th 2011 at 10:00am UTC

Show Me the Money: The Geography of Superstar Sports Millionaires

Friday, April 29th, 2011

Boxer Manny Pacquiao and baseball star Alex Rodriguez top the list of the world’s highest paid athletes, according to new data compiled by ESPN.

ESPN tracked annual salaries—the base pay the players received for their most recent season or calendar year (endorsements and other sources of income were excluded) across 182 nations and 17 sports, from baseball and basketball to badminton and cricket. Salary data was collected from “multiple sources, including leagues, agents, consulates, embassies, sports federations, cultural centers and the U.N.”

Wake up America: It’s not football, baseball, basketball, or even NASCAR that accounts for the lion’s share of sports superstars: 114 of the 184 best-paid athletes in the world play soccer—almost seven times more than the next runner up (basketball, with 18 uber-rich players). For the rest, there are 12 baseball players, six auto-racers, five golfers, five football players, four cricketeers, three boxers, and three track and field contestants. Rugby and tennis each contribute two competitors and there is one representative each from badminton, cycling, motorcycle racing, sumo wrestling, and yachting. (more…)

Richard Florida
by Richard Florida
Wed Apr 27th 2011 at 10:00am UTC

America’s Best Cities for Plug-in Cars

Wednesday, April 27th, 2011

The map above, from Ford via greenautoblog.com, shows the 25 American cities that are the most ready for electric vehicles (EVs).

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Richard Florida
by Richard Florida
Thu Apr 21st 2011 at 10:01am UTC

The Thriving and Happiness of Nations

Thursday, April 21st, 2011

Denmark, Sweden and Canada lead the world in high-well being – the percent of people who say they are “thriving” in life, according to a newly released survey by the Gallup Organization. The U.S. ranked 12th, behind Panama and Venezuela. Nineteen countries registered high rates of well-being, with more than half of their populations reporting that they are thriving in their day to day lives.

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Richard Florida
by Richard Florida
Wed Apr 20th 2011 at 10:00am UTC

Immigrants and the Wealth of Nations

Wednesday, April 20th, 2011

Whether they see immigration as a good thing or a scourge, Americans like to think of their country as an immigrant-friendly place, with borders that are among the most open in the world.

But that’s not the case, according to a new comprehensive measure developed by the British Council and the Brussels-based Migration Policy Group. The Migration Integration Policy Index (MIPEX) rates the EU nations’ (plus Norway, Switzerland, Canada, and the U.S.—31 countries in all) efforts to integrate immigrants according to 148 policy indicators, which range from opportunities for education and political participation to levels of protection against discrimination, from prospects for reuniting with family to the likelihood of achieving permanent residence status and citizenship.

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Richard Florida
by Richard Florida
Wed Apr 13th 2011 at 2:30am UTC

Elite Crisis

Wednesday, April 13th, 2011

From the usual suspects in the Tea Party to the newly populist billionaire Donald Trump, Americans have been registering their frustration with the federal government. But it isn’t just government that has used up their patience.  According to new polling data from the Gallup Organization, Americans are suffering a crisis of confidence with most big political, financial, business, labor and government institutions (see chart below).

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Reham Alexander
by Reham Alexander
Wed Apr 6th 2011 at 5:52pm UTC

The creative class, post-industrialism and the happiness of nations

Wednesday, April 6th, 2011

Richard’s new article, “The creative class, post industrialism and the happiness of nations”  written with Charlotta Mellander and Jason Rentfrow has recently been published by the Cambridge Journal on Regions, Economy and Society.   Below is the abstract.

“Our research examines the role of post-industrial structures and values on happiness across the nations of the world. We argue that these structures and values shape happiness in ways that go beyond the previously examined effects of income. Our analysis explores whether income has different effects on countries at different stages of economic development. Our results indicate that post-industrial structures and values have a stronger effect on happiness in higher income countries, where the standard of living has surpassed a certain level. Income, on the other hand, has a stronger impact on happiness in low-income countries.”

Read the full article here

Richard Florida
by Richard Florida
Wed Apr 6th 2011 at 7:30am UTC

The Metro Story: Growth without Growth

Wednesday, April 6th, 2011

The conventional wisdom presumes that growing populations bring economic growth. But what drives wealth isn’t how many people a place is adding, but how much more productive its workers are becoming.  Yesterday, I showed that population growth and productivity growth are unrelated on the level of states. Today, drawing on my ongoing research with Kevin Stolarick of the Martin Prosperity Institute and Jose Lobo of Arizona State University, I’ll take a look at the pattern for 350 plus U.S. metro areas. The disconnect is even more pronounced.

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Richard Florida
by Richard Florida
Tue Apr 5th 2011 at 7:30am UTC

The State Story: Growth without Growth

Tuesday, April 5th, 2011

This past weekend, I had an oped in the New York Daily News about the widespread fallacy that population growth and prosperity go hand in hand.

Yes, the Sunbelt is growing and the Frostbelt declining.  That decades old meme was confirmed by the earliest releases of the new 2010 Census. “The quest for mild winters remains the great constant of American demographics,” wrote Walter Shapiro in a piece headlined “The Census Ratifies the Sunbelt’s Supremacy and Buoys the GOP.  “For the first time in history, more than half of the nation’s population (308,745,538) resides either in the South or in the warm-weather states of California, Arizona and New Mexico.”

But are those states that are adding people also growing economically?   Not so much, actually.

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