Archive for the ‘Work’ Category

Reham Alexander
by Reham Alexander
Thu Jun 23rd 2011 at 11:05am UTC

A New Perspective on Creativity

Thursday, June 23rd, 2011

Le Méridien is proud to announce Richard and Rana Florida as its newest members to its creative community. This year, Le Méridien continues its creative journey in providing its guests with new cultural experiences by introducing the cultural ‘hub’;  the hotels innovative lobby concept, as well as expanding upon its global creative community of LM100 members. This group of innovators will work to transform Le Méridien hotels into creative hubs that will deliver new perspectives to the creative guest.

The Creative Class Group will embark on a variety of initiatives influenced by the creative group they have identified. They will perform research to help Le Méridien identify new development opportunities by applying their exclusive ‘creativity index’, using the Creative Class Group’s one-of-a-kind framework; technology + talent + tolerance and territorial assets. CCG will help to connect Le Méridien hotels to key contacts in each city from the fields of tourism, culture, art, design and cuisine. They will work to acquire influential speakers to participate in “New Perspective Events” at Le Méridien hotels across the globe. CCG  will also curate content for the ‘Hub’ libraries selected based on their research on the core attributes, values and preferences of the Creative Class. The books selected will comprise of a mix of contemporary and foundational books about creative culture in the arts, design, economy and society, as well as localized books reflecting each cities history and characteristics.

Read the full release here.

Photo © Ralph Gibson

Richard Florida
by Richard Florida
Fri Jun 10th 2011 at 10:00am UTC

Skills and the Great (Male) Stagnation

Friday, June 10th, 2011

Ever since Hannah Rosin’s Atlantic essay “The End of Men” there has been great speculation about the effects of the ongoing economic crisis – as well as the broader, longer running economic transformation that the recession is part and parcel of – on the relative economic positions of men and women. Some have even gone so far as to dub the current crisis the “mancession,” though male employment appears to have turned up sharply over the past year..

Alex Tabarrok’s insightful post at Marginal Revolution bears on this issue. Take look at the two charts below from his analysis. The first compares the rate of growth in real economic output (GDP) per capita to median male income for the period 1947 to 2010.  The second does the same for women.

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Richard Florida
by Richard Florida
Sat Jun 4th 2011 at 1:35pm UTC

Where Paychecks Go the Furthest: 20 Best and Worst Cities

Saturday, June 4th, 2011

As anyone who has ever paid Manhattan rents swiftly learns, New York City’s relatively high salaries don’t go very far.  In fact, when cost of living is taken into account, the New York metro posts the second lowest “real income” of any region with more than 500,000 people, according to an analysis commissioned by US News and World Report. New York’s median household income of $62,887 falls to an adjusted real income of just $35,370 when cost of living is taken into account.  Only the McAllen-Edinburg-Mission metro in Texas, one of the very poorest in the nation with an actual income of just $30,460, fares worse with a real income of $34,931.

Des Moines takes the top spot on this real income measure: Its median income of $56,576 translates into $62,446 in spending power.  Greater Washington DC takes second place:  Its median income of $85,168, one of the highest in the nation, equals $61,449 when adjusted for cost of living. Two Texas metros – Houston and Dallas – also stand out, as well as leading college towns.

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Richard Florida
by Richard Florida
Fri May 20th 2011 at 11:55am UTC

Best Places for College Grads

Friday, May 20th, 2011

Congratulations, Class of 2011, and welcome to a job market that’s only a little less terrible than the one that last year’s graduates had to contend with. Don’t feel too bad if you’re moving back to your parents’ house. According to a widely-reported recent survey, that’s where some 85 percent of your classmates are headed too.  Still, you’re going to be striking off on your own at some point, and the choices you’ll make about where to live can make an enormous difference in the kind of jobs you can get to help launch your career and life.

To seize your opportunities and navigate a career in this new borderless world, you have to be prepared to pick up stakes. Depending upon where Mom and Dad live, you might need to move to get that critical first job.

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Richard Florida
by Richard Florida
Thu May 5th 2011 at 10:15am UTC

Building America’s Third Great Job Machine

Thursday, May 5th, 2011

My oped in today’s Financial Times makes a case for a radical approach to solving America’s jobs problem—upgrading low wage service jobs.  Here’s a longer, original version of that piece, including the critical chart (immediately below) compiled by my colleagues at the Martin Prosperity Institute.  The chart tracks the rise and fall of four broad classes of work – agricultural work (farm), industrial work (manuf), knowledge-based and creative work (CC), and routine low-wage service work (LWS) – from 1800 through 2009. (more…)

Reham Alexander
by Reham Alexander
Wed Apr 6th 2011 at 5:52pm UTC

The creative class, post-industrialism and the happiness of nations

Wednesday, April 6th, 2011

Richard’s new article, “The creative class, post industrialism and the happiness of nations”  written with Charlotta Mellander and Jason Rentfrow has recently been published by the Cambridge Journal on Regions, Economy and Society.   Below is the abstract.

“Our research examines the role of post-industrial structures and values on happiness across the nations of the world. We argue that these structures and values shape happiness in ways that go beyond the previously examined effects of income. Our analysis explores whether income has different effects on countries at different stages of economic development. Our results indicate that post-industrial structures and values have a stronger effect on happiness in higher income countries, where the standard of living has surpassed a certain level. Income, on the other hand, has a stronger impact on happiness in low-income countries.”

Read the full article here

Richard Florida
by Richard Florida
Wed Apr 6th 2011 at 7:30am UTC

The Metro Story: Growth without Growth

Wednesday, April 6th, 2011

The conventional wisdom presumes that growing populations bring economic growth. But what drives wealth isn’t how many people a place is adding, but how much more productive its workers are becoming.  Yesterday, I showed that population growth and productivity growth are unrelated on the level of states. Today, drawing on my ongoing research with Kevin Stolarick of the Martin Prosperity Institute and Jose Lobo of Arizona State University, I’ll take a look at the pattern for 350 plus U.S. metro areas. The disconnect is even more pronounced.

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Richard Florida
by Richard Florida
Tue Apr 5th 2011 at 7:30am UTC

The State Story: Growth without Growth

Tuesday, April 5th, 2011

This past weekend, I had an oped in the New York Daily News about the widespread fallacy that population growth and prosperity go hand in hand.

Yes, the Sunbelt is growing and the Frostbelt declining.  That decades old meme was confirmed by the earliest releases of the new 2010 Census. “The quest for mild winters remains the great constant of American demographics,” wrote Walter Shapiro in a piece headlined “The Census Ratifies the Sunbelt’s Supremacy and Buoys the GOP.  “For the first time in history, more than half of the nation’s population (308,745,538) resides either in the South or in the warm-weather states of California, Arizona and New Mexico.”

But are those states that are adding people also growing economically?   Not so much, actually.

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Richard Florida
by Richard Florida
Mon Feb 28th 2011 at 5:54pm UTC

Chart of the Day: The Geography of Successful Start Companies

Monday, February 28th, 2011

The chart, from the blog Empirical Reality, shows SP Tech 1500 companies by location & founding date  (via vwadhwa, @ngoggans).  We’ve all known the Silicon Valley is important, but its dominance over time is striking.

Steven Pedigo
by Steven Pedigo
Tue Jan 25th 2011 at 10:01am UTC

“Creativity in Play” Interview

Tuesday, January 25th, 2011

Richard Florida’s on-line radio interview with “Creativity in Play” hosts, Steve Dahlberg and Mary Alice Long on why creativity matters in cities and communities, what the state of today’s economy means for creativity, and where we stand in “The Great Reset.” Listen to the full interview here.