Archive for the ‘Creative Class’ Category

Reham Alexander
by Reham Alexander
Thu Jun 23rd 2011 at 11:05am UTC

A New Perspective on Creativity

Thursday, June 23rd, 2011

Le Méridien is proud to announce Richard and Rana Florida as its newest members to its creative community. This year, Le Méridien continues its creative journey in providing its guests with new cultural experiences by introducing the cultural ‘hub’;  the hotels innovative lobby concept, as well as expanding upon its global creative community of LM100 members. This group of innovators will work to transform Le Méridien hotels into creative hubs that will deliver new perspectives to the creative guest.

The Creative Class Group will embark on a variety of initiatives influenced by the creative group they have identified. They will perform research to help Le Méridien identify new development opportunities by applying their exclusive ‘creativity index’, using the Creative Class Group’s one-of-a-kind framework; technology + talent + tolerance and territorial assets. CCG will help to connect Le Méridien hotels to key contacts in each city from the fields of tourism, culture, art, design and cuisine. They will work to acquire influential speakers to participate in “New Perspective Events” at Le Méridien hotels across the globe. CCG  will also curate content for the ‘Hub’ libraries selected based on their research on the core attributes, values and preferences of the Creative Class. The books selected will comprise of a mix of contemporary and foundational books about creative culture in the arts, design, economy and society, as well as localized books reflecting each cities history and characteristics.

Read the full release here.

Photo © Ralph Gibson

Reham Alexander
by Reham Alexander
Wed Apr 6th 2011 at 5:52pm UTC

The creative class, post-industrialism and the happiness of nations

Wednesday, April 6th, 2011

Richard’s new article, “The creative class, post industrialism and the happiness of nations”  written with Charlotta Mellander and Jason Rentfrow has recently been published by the Cambridge Journal on Regions, Economy and Society.   Below is the abstract.

“Our research examines the role of post-industrial structures and values on happiness across the nations of the world. We argue that these structures and values shape happiness in ways that go beyond the previously examined effects of income. Our analysis explores whether income has different effects on countries at different stages of economic development. Our results indicate that post-industrial structures and values have a stronger effect on happiness in higher income countries, where the standard of living has surpassed a certain level. Income, on the other hand, has a stronger impact on happiness in low-income countries.”

Read the full article here

Steven Pedigo
by Steven Pedigo
Tue Jan 25th 2011 at 10:01am UTC

“Creativity in Play” Interview

Tuesday, January 25th, 2011

Richard Florida’s on-line radio interview with “Creativity in Play” hosts, Steve Dahlberg and Mary Alice Long on why creativity matters in cities and communities, what the state of today’s economy means for creativity, and where we stand in “The Great Reset.” Listen to the full interview here.

Richard Florida
by Richard Florida
Mon Nov 22nd 2010 at 3:14pm UTC

Fiat Targets the Creative Class

Monday, November 22nd, 2010

Fiat is looking to follow Mini’s lead when it comes to customization for consumers. “The personalization is something that customers want.” The design centers inside the dealership will be a lot like the ones you’d find in a new subdivision, with lots of choices. “Those are all of the different 14 interiors, exteriors,” Soave said, “but you can mix and match, and that’s part of the deal.”  … these design centers are not strictly up-sell areas. Depending on the shopper, though, they can be.

The full story is here.

Richard Florida
by Richard Florida
Thu Oct 21st 2010 at 12:25pm UTC

The Creative Class and Happiness

Thursday, October 21st, 2010

My new paper with Charlotta Mellander and Jason Rentfrow examines the role of the creative class and other markers of post-industrial societies and happiness. Here’s the abstract:

Our research examines the role of post-industrial structures and values on happiness across the nations of the world. We argue that these structures and values shape happiness in ways that go beyond the previously examined effects of income. Drawing from previous theory and research, we measured post-industrial structures in terms of higher level education and the share of the workforce engaged in knowledge-based/ creative work. Post-industrial values were measured in terms of acceptance of racial and ethnic minorities and of gays and lesbians. Our measure of happiness is derived from a large-scale global survey of life satisfaction conducted by the Gallup Organization. We controlled for income in our analyses and divided our sample into high- and low-income countries to explore whether income has different effects on countries at different stages of economic development. Our results indicate that post-industrial structures and values have a stronger effect on happiness in higher-income countries, where the standard of living has surpassed a certain level. Income, on the other hand, has a stronger impact on happiness in low-income countries. Thus, we propose that when income rises beyond a certain level, a new system of post-industrial values centered on education, creativity, and openness become better predictors of happiness than income.

The full paper is here.


Richard Florida
by Richard Florida
Thu Oct 7th 2010 at 1:31pm UTC

Support for the Creative Class

Thursday, October 7th, 2010

That’s the title of this Wall Street Journal story on a new Rockefeller Foundation Initiative to support the creative class.

To assure the city remains the cultural and creative leader of the world, the Rockefeller Foundation is giving more than $3 million to support local artists and arts organizations.

More than 400 applicants vied for a chance to receive two-year grants, ranging from $50,000 to $250,000. Eighteen winners were chosen, including Bowery Arts & Science, to project the works of poets onto walls and buildings in city neighborhoods and the City University of New York Institute for Sustainable Cities in partnership with Artist as Citizen, to create an online atlas that traces the city’s environmental transformation and maps out the future of the city’s environment …

“It’s a new business model that builds the financial resilience of the arts sector while maintaining the artistic capacity,” says Judith Rodin, president of the Rockefeller Foundation.

(more…)

Richard Florida
by Richard Florida
Fri Jul 16th 2010 at 1:54pm UTC

Food and the City

Friday, July 16th, 2010

Food is increasingly a key element of the city and of city life. Ever at the cutting-edge of trends that are reshaping the city, Chicago Mayor Rich Daley has become the No. 1 ambassador for the city’s world-class food scene, according to this report in The New York Times.

The mayor’s pride in Chicago’s growing stature in the world of haute cuisine was on display again this week. After Mr. Daley spent much of last week in Idaho at a conference of the nation’s news media moguls, his next two public appearances in Chicago involved promoting the local gastronomy scene

The mayor made a stop at the French Pastry School on Monday to promote its expansion into new teaching kitchens at the City Colleges of Chicago. The school’s chefs had recently visited City Hall to present the mayor with a chocolate replica of the Blackhawks’ Stanley Cup trophy. The mayor beamed below the brim of a tall chef’s hat” …  “He’s the best cheerleader for the industry that anybody could ask for,” said Sheila O’Grady, the mayor’s former chief of staff who is now president of the Illinois Restaurant Association.”

Money quote: “These chefs, to me, represent the creative class of society,” Mr. Daley said. “We have to realize how important they are to the city.”

Richard Florida
by Richard Florida
Thu Apr 8th 2010 at 5:22pm UTC

Apple and the Creative Class

Thursday, April 8th, 2010

A headline on the Wall Street Journal’s Digits blog blasts: “Can Apple Maintain Status as Religion of the ‘Creative Class’?

Apple’s core following has traditionally been the creative class. They are graphic designers and artists, and they constitute a “church” of sorts… Apple in a sense cultivated this “underdog” or creative-class status to successfully market its products. Consider Apple’s “Think Different” ad campaign, or its ubiquitous Apple vs. PC ads featuring a young, hip Justin Long… With the release of the iPad, the question is whether Apple can maintain this “underdog” or special status… Still, the iPad is a new kind of product for Apple, one geared not so much to its traditional creative class or “inner church,” as to a general audience merely interested in viewing media and not creating it.

(more…)

Steven Pedigo
by Steven Pedigo
Fri Jan 22nd 2010 at 8:04pm UTC

Thinking Big: How the Creative Class Is Changing Business

Friday, January 22nd, 2010

lightbulb

Richard recently appeared on Big Think to share his ideas on how the Creative Class is impacting the way businesses think.

Now more than ever, companies need unconventional thinking to work within the new rules set by the economic recession. Richard Florida has persuasively demonstrated how artists, scientists, engineers, writers, musicians and more can revitalize an entire city from urban decay. With today’s companies dealing with a deep recession, what can members of the Creative Class do for businesses?”

Check out the interview here.


CCE Editor
by CCE Editor
Fri Jan 22nd 2010 at 11:14am UTC

Keynote at the MMA in Boston

Friday, January 22nd, 2010

Compass

Richard Florida is in Boston today at the Massachusetts Municipal Association, serving as the keynote speaker for their annual meeting. From their website:

The MMA Annual Meeting and Trade Show is the largest regular gathering of Massachusetts local government officials. The two-day event features educational workshops, nationally recognized speakers, awards programs, a large trade show, and an opportunity to network with municipal officials from across the state.

The MMA’s Annual Meeting is your best single opportunity to:

• Learn about solutions to problems facing your community
• Meet people who can assist you with resources and ideas
• Learn about valuable products and services for cities and towns
• Attend programs that will strengthen your ability to lead and serve your community

What opportunities does your community offer to engage with other residents and incite change?