Posts Tagged ‘class’

CCE Editor
by CCE Editor
Fri Aug 19th 2011 at 12:41pm UTC

The Inchoate Rage Beneath our Global Cities

Friday, August 19th, 2011

“London’s riots prompted commentators on the right to blame hooliganism, while those on the left cited frustrations with the UK’s faltering economy and fiscal austerity. But the causes run deeper and are linked fundamentally to the changing structure of the world’s economy. They are problems many of our global cities will soon face.

Globalization has made our great cities incalculably richer but also increasingly divided and unequal. More than youth, ethnicity or even race, London’s riots are about class and the growing divide between the classes. This dynamic is not unique to London but is at work in many of the world’s great capitals. Instead of reducing and flattening economic distinctions, globalisation has made them sharper.”

To read more, check out Richard’s recent column in the Financial Times.

Richard Florida
by Richard Florida
Tue May 19th 2009 at 3:00pm UTC

Why Class Still Matters

Tuesday, May 19th, 2009

Class is a word that elicits strong, and sometimes strange, reactions from many Americans. Once a powerful construct understanding economies and societies, class has been all but banished from the lexicon of social scientists and from the public conversation.

It’s time we put class back in the center of our vocabulary, especially so during this ongoing economic crisis and reset. The impacts of the crisis have been extremely uneven by class – hitting hardest at the industrial working class and their communities.

Over the coming week, I’ll be posting on that, and also on the powerful effects of class on the wealth, innovativeness, and happiness of nations, drawing on a variety of statistical analyses conducted with Charlotta Mellander and my Martin Prosperity Institute colleagues.

We define class simply by peoples’ position in the economy - not by perceived status, level of income, or what we consume, but by the kind of work we do. Conveniently, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics keeps detailed statistics on the myriad occupations that make up the U.S. economy.

We identify three core classes:

The working class who work in production, transportation, construction, and related jobs.

The service class who work in jobs like food prep, grounds cleaning, building maintenance, personal care, administrative offices, and community, social, and protective services.

The creative class of scientists, engineers, and entrepreneurs; artists, designers, media types, and entertainers; and knowledge-based professionals in management, health care, education, and related fields.

I’ll report on the relationship between class and various social and economic outcomes over the next several days, starting with the relationship between class and economic output tomorrow. On Wednesday we turn to class and technological innovation; class and entrepreneurship on Thursday; and class and the happiness of various nations on Friday. Along the way, I’ll also post on the uneven ways that recessions impact different classes, and relationship between class and unemployment, among other things.

Stay tuned.

Richard Florida
by Richard Florida
Wed Sep 24th 2008 at 8:26am UTC

Morals of the Creative Class

Wednesday, September 24th, 2008

A reader asks:

I’ve read Jane Jacobs, now I’m reading your books. After reading The Rise of the Creative Class, the question that jumps out at me is that this “Class” appears to be amoral. Is that true?
What say you?