Posts Tagged ‘Kevin Stolarick’

Richard Florida
by Richard Florida
Sun Jan 23rd 2011 at 10:00am UTC

Geographies of Scope

Sunday, January 23rd, 2011

That’s the title of my new article with Kevin Stolarick and Charlotta Mellander just out in the Journal of Economic Geography.

Here’s the abstract:

The geographic clustering of economic activity has long been understood in terms of economies of scale across space. This paper introduces the construct of geographies of scope, which we argue is driven by substantial, large-scale geographic concentrations of related skills, inputs and capabilities. We examine this through an empirical analysis of the entertainment industry across U.S. metropolitan areas from 1970 to 2000. Our findings indicate that geographies of scope (or collocation among key related entertainment subsectors and inputs) explain much of the economic geography of entertainment even when scale is controlled for, though our regressions over time suggest the role of scope is decreasing. Furthermore, we find that the entertainment sector as a whole and its key subsectors are significantly concentrated in two superstar cities—New York and Los Angeles—far beyond what their population size (or scale effects) can account for, while the pattern falls off dramatically for other large regions.

The full article is here.

Richard Florida
by Richard Florida
Sat Nov 7th 2009 at 9:00am UTC

Beautiful Places

Saturday, November 7th, 2009

ForestBluebellsPath

Here’s the abstract for a new paper on said with Charlotta Mellander and Kevin Stolarick.

Economists have argued that individuals choose locations that maximize their economic position and broad utility. Sociologists have found that social networks and social interactions shape our satisfaction with our communities. Research, across various social science fields, finds that beauty has a significant effect on various economic and social outcomes. Our research uses a large survey sample of individuals across US locations to examine the effects of beauty and aesthetics on community satisfaction. We test for these effects in light of other community-level factors such as economic security and employment opportunities; the supply of public goods; the ability for social exchange, that is to meet people and make friends; artistic and cultural opportunities, and outdoor recreation; as well as individual demographic characteristics such as gender, age, presence of children, length of residence, income and education levels, and housing values. The findings confirm that perceived beauty or aesthetic character of a location has a positive and significant effect on perceived community satisfaction. It is one of the most significant factors alongside economic security, good schools, and the perceived capacity for social interaction. We also find community-level factors to be significantly more important than individual demographic characteristics in explaining community satisfaction.

The full paper is over at the MPI site, here.

Richard Florida
by Richard Florida
Mon Oct 19th 2009 at 4:02pm UTC

What Color is Your Toronto?

Monday, October 19th, 2009

Kevin Stolarick and our MPI team map Toronto’s personalities featured in this article from the Toronto Star. The patterns could not be more striking.

Thoughts, anyone?

Richard Florida
by Richard Florida
Sat May 30th 2009 at 11:00am UTC

America’s Most Resilient Cities

Saturday, May 30th, 2009

Image courtesy of Kiplinger’s

My MPI colleague Kevin Stolarick lists the nation’s most economically “resilient” cities over at Kiplinger’s. His rankings are based on: current employment trends, historical employment, and unemployment performance; how the region did when national unemployment increased; the share of professional, knowledge, and creative jobs; and cost of living. Here’s the top ten.

  1. Huntsville, Alabama
  2. Albuquerque, New Mexico
  3. Washington, D.C.
  4. Charlottesville, Virginia
  5. Athens, Georgia
  6. Olympia, Washington
  7. Madison, Wisconsin
  8. Austin, Texas
  9. Flagstaff, Arizona
  10. Raleigh, North Carolina

Detailed rankings of all 361 U.S. regions are here.