Posts Tagged ‘The Atlantic’

Richard Florida
by Richard Florida
Wed Jan 12th 2011 at 7:12pm UTC

A Canadian in Tucson

Wednesday, January 12th, 2011

Wendy Waters comments on my Atlantic post on the Tucson shootings and the culture of honor.

I went to grad school in Tucson. Loved the city and region in so many ways. Gun violence perpetrated by the mentally ill was something that this Canadian found hard to get used to.

Although last week’s incident had more human victims, my sense from living there was that it wasn’t unusual to have someone suffering from a mental-illness issue wandering public places with a loaded gun.

One incident at the U of Arizona while I was there involved an individual walking into the grad student computer lab (at a time when I was usually there, but thankfully wasn’t this time), opening fire, missing all the people but destroying two computers, and then wandering down the main campus waving his gun before police grabbed him. It was never clear why he did this (hearing voices, maybe). Subsequent investigation revealed he had long been in treatment from mental illness, but that this did not prevent him from purchasing the firearm legally the previous week because mental health records cannot be used in background checks.

Yes this story is anecdotal but maybe the answer to why certain people in certain places commit these mass murders is a combination of less help for the mentally ill combined with slightly easier access to weapons.

CCE Editor
by CCE Editor
Thu Jun 3rd 2010 at 8:28pm UTC

The Burden of Home Ownership

Thursday, June 3rd, 2010

The Florida Report is an eight-part video series from The Atlantic featuring Richard Florida.

The eighth and final installment in The Florida Report is titled “The Burden of Home Ownership.” Richard argues that Americans need to get over their obsession with home ownership.

To view the other videos in this series, please click here.

CCE Editor
by CCE Editor
Tue Jun 1st 2010 at 10:14am UTC

Detroit Roots

Tuesday, June 1st, 2010

The Florida Report is an eight-part video series from The Atlantic featuring Richard Florida.

The seventh installment in The Florida Report is titled “Why Detroit Needs to Go Back to Its Roots.” Richard argues that planned shrinkage isn’t the best way to save Motown.

To view the other videos in this series, please click here.

CCE Editor
by CCE Editor
Thu May 27th 2010 at 3:52pm UTC

Will Phoenix Rise from the Flames?

Thursday, May 27th, 2010

The Florida Report is an eight-part video series from The Atlantic featuring Richard Florida.

The sixth installment in The Florida Report is titled “Will Phoenix Rise from the Flames?” Richard reflects on whether or not the Sunbelt can make a comeback.

CCE Editor
by CCE Editor
Tue May 25th 2010 at 3:30pm UTC

Beyond Wall Street

Tuesday, May 25th, 2010

The Florida Report is an eight-part video series from The Atlantic featuring Richard Florida.

The fifth installment in The Florida Report is titled “Beyond Wall Street.” Richard explains how the financial crisis might help New York find a new sense of balance.

CCE Editor
by CCE Editor
Thu May 20th 2010 at 3:29pm UTC

Megaregions of the Future

Thursday, May 20th, 2010

The Florida Report is an eight-part video series from The Atlantic featuring Richard Florida.

The fourth installment in The Florida Report is titled “Megaregions of the Future.” Richard describes the shift from suburbs to enormous metropolitan regions.

CCE Editor
by CCE Editor
Tue May 18th 2010 at 9:11pm UTC

Why Cities Are Idea Factories

Tuesday, May 18th, 2010

The Florida Report is an eight-part video series from The Atlantic featuring Richard Florida.

The third installment in The Florida Report is titled “Why Cities Are Idea Factories.” Richard discusses the forces that give rise to innovation in urban areas.

CCE Editor
by CCE Editor
Thu May 13th 2010 at 11:19am UTC

Moving to the Suburbs

Thursday, May 13th, 2010

The Florida Report is an eight-part video series from The Atlantic featuring Richard Florida.

The second installment in The Florida Report is titled “Moving to the Suburbs.” Richard explains why long commutes used to make sense… and why they no longer do.

CCE Editor
by CCE Editor
Tue May 11th 2010 at 12:18pm UTC

The Birth of Urban America

Tuesday, May 11th, 2010

The Florida Report is an eight-part video series from The Atlantic featuring Richard Florida.

The Birth of Urban America” is the first installment in The Florida Report. Richard talks to Don Peck, deputy managing editor of The Atlantic, about how the great American cities rose out of the Industrial Revolution.

Richard Florida
by Richard Florida
Mon May 25th 2009 at 2:00pm UTC

People and Places

Monday, May 25th, 2009

The Next American City’s Josh Leon reacts to my March Atlantic essay on cities and the crisis:

[N]ot everyone can afford to move and the poorest are left behind amidst urban blight and neglect. What do we do about the immobile? What do we do with cities that are net losers of the “creative class”? For this so-called creative brand of capitalism, the uncreative are someone else’s problem …There is an inherent inhumanity in leaving people and their cities in the dust. Besides, the cost of finding ways to get so-called obsolete classes of workers gainfully employed where they live is looking preferable to the social costs of managing huge ghost cities and permanent spatial inequality.

All sentiments I share. The first step – and the main point of my essay – is to elevate the issue of growing geographic inequality and bring it into the ongoing conversation about the crisis and recovery.

But what can be done? How to create whole new industries and jobs in declining places? Protecting old industries or baling out uncompetitive firms – two preferred solutions – make little economic sense. So what’s left?

We can confer subsidies on places to improve their infrastructure, universities, and core institutions, or quality of life. But this still is unlikely to stem the tide of the talented and the mobile, at least in the short-run. We can take a longer-term approach and help them gradually shift away from declining industries and build around their remaining assets organically and over time.

At the end of the day, people – not industries or even places – should be our biggest concern. We can best help those who are hardest-hit by the crisis, by providing a generous social safety, investing in their skills, and when necessary helping them become mobile and move to where the opportunities are.